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out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensure that we can con
this time, and all of a sudden it's an issue now so that is interesting and the use is not changing from what it's been but the use is not technically what they have been asking for. they need the approval by us to have their use to conform to what we're doing as opposed to the previous cu which was more limited -- although the distinction sometimes is rather vague because we went through the same thing at westportal and the proprietor suffered a fire and not in business anymore but we went through conditions in that case had real specifications and you will only have so many chairs and strict conditions. i don't remember in 2005 -- there could be 20 people have a wine tasting at the same time under the approval of 2005. i can't recall a specific limitation on the tasting going on, but with that being said there is a lot of local support for it. there are some people speaking against it again and there are a couple neighborhood groups just recently come out against it. they may not have been in support at any time but recently we're hearing they're opposing it, but you always have to
at the future. we are taking a look at some of the most exciting technologies in elevators. george, tell us about destination elevators. >> this is the technology of the future. probably the biggest single investment in elevators. san francisco has embraced the technology more than any other city in the country. a big advantage with us is passengers get to their floors sooner and there is more opportunity of customization of features for individual service. four issues of security and accessibility, this is a big advantage over traditional elevators. digest i understand these are rehabilitated upgrades of existing elevators? >> yes, these are upgrades to the original elevators from 1980. all the controls and wiring has changed but the physical mechanisms are the same. >> how much energy to these use? >> with all of the things that we did hear, energy savings is about 50% from where we started. that is a significant improvement for such a major system. >> tell me how it works. >> this is the hall keypad, which controls the elevator. the system asks where you are going before you get into the
that are familiar to us and they are, it's a great exercise for us tactically as well. we are able to integrate with cal fire itself with the objective being the fire itself. those work out for us here and we can go ahead and use those skills forward as well. thank you very much, we appreciate the opportunity. >> thank you, i'd like to thank our panelists and open it up to our group for any questions of our panelists today. yes, sir, secretary. >> there are a lot of things you can do in a forest that tend to make it easier it fight a fire like most importantly burning off the fuel during the wet season so there's less for the fire to feed on. to what extent in cal fire and all your other things do you encourage people to do things in their forest when you don't have a fire that make it easier and more effective in fighting the fire? >> it's an excellent question, sir. we spend a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation management program in cal fire, we have a robust program throughout
eaters are interested in cuisine. there adventuress. the fact theyuse grea use great ingredients and make gourmet food makes unpopular. >> i have been dying to have these. >> i have had that roach coach experience. it is great they're making food they can trust. >> have you decided? >> we are in the thick of the competition? >> my game was thrown off because they pulled out of my first appetizer choice. >> how we going to crush clear? >> it will be easy. probably everyone has tried, something bacon tell us delicious. >> -- people tell us is delicious. >> hopefully you think the same thing. >> hopefully i am going to win. we're in the financial district. there is a food truck right there. every day changes. it is easy and fun to go down. these are going to be really good. >> how are you going to dominate? >> i think he does not know what he is doing. >> i was thinking of doing [unintelligible] we are underrepresented. >> i was singing of starting an irish pub. that was my idea. >> one our biggest is the corned beef and cabbage. we are asking people what they're thinking in getting some fee
to and for the zoning or conditional use and if you don't do that the police didn't oppose it and luckily the police are opposing. >> thank you. next speakers. cynthia joe and sue hester. >> i am cynthia joe. i was a planning commissioner from 1996 to 2002 so time flies when you don't have to listen to the fellow commissioners comments. i am here to honor linda's retirement. "i better not cry. i better not show. i am telling you why she is retiring today". well linda we want to you thank for being even handed and efficient in serving the city and we wish you god's blessing in your retirement. we love you. >> thank you. >> sue hester. i thought it was most appropriate for me to come to talk to linda where i normally am at the planning commission. 31 years is a long time. 31 years ago the plan was being developed. i lived at 20th and douglas. i didn't live in bern nal heights. we have been at least three cycles of the economy in san francisco. we have had boomer bust cycles at least three times since linda has been working here, and i am very heartened. i am disheartened by linda's retireme
of appeal in giving the city latitude in order to use portions of parks for non-recreational structures that somehow facilitated the use of the recreational activities at the park. that is obsolete in a couple of critical ways. one way is that the previous provision did not require a vote of the electorate. it was a flat prohibition on using park property for non-recreational purposes. this is simpaly procedural requirement that you go to the electors to get permission to build a non-gaap recreational structure. >> not just to build, but to maintain or to use and i'm sorry, i'm a little confused that before you made this argument wouldn't have considered what the ramifications are in terms of other uses and things that are maintained in parks that are not themselves directly recreational. because of course, any legal argument you need to know what the ramifications are to make that argument as opposed to saying that we're going make it here, but yeah, maybe you can no longer use roads or have a muni stop or have a food concession or put any more bike lanes in the park because that is n
mathai alongside jessica. this is happening twice for us. >> deja vu. if you win it, they will come. downtown is the field of dreams for the giants for this 108th world series. they back. the boys of summer really in their glory and it's just going to be a whole celebration about today. we want to show you a little bit of the course they are taking and along the route, we have thousands of people. it starts at the foot of the ferry plaza on stewart street where you have all of the cars. the giants with their families and management team and all those floats, you know, raj, they have been working on these floats for a little bit. we have tid bits about the floats. they will end up at the steps of city hall which is expected to be a glorious celebration. >> that is where we are. at city hall. that ceremony will begin. before the ceremony, you will see the players and management and coaches coming through on the cars. that is a fun part of the par e parade. it is off camera and off scripted. that will be a lot of fun. >> that is what the fans love. people have been lining the streets
, people who can't spend a lot of time in meetings with us, that can actually offer their ideas on line, and we take those ideas very seriously. so we've been working on things on like how to make muni faster, how to bring fresh foods to low income poverty areas of the city, and our newest one, just to given you a sense, we wanted everybody to help us develop and design a new library card. talk about civic engagement. 2,000 submissions on line for a new designed library card. that leads me to a challenge that i would like to announce, as part of this night rover challenge, and that is we have been asking ourselves a question, along the lines of energy use in the city, something that has been hard for us to figure out. and that has to do with what would inspire you, as someone who lives in the city, to give your data of your own energy use in the city, like your home energy use? all that data about when you use it, what are your hot times, your cool times. how about if we try to find some way to inspire people to give us that]h data, in some coordinated way. because if we understand that
a right. right now we have been working very hard with mr. alvarez. he took us through the house rules and everything. three weeks ago we had a meeting. i didn't agree with these house rules and we did a petition in huntersview to go over it again. we took it down to the mayor's office, to amy peterson, who is here today, but we still haven't heard from them. one of our main concerns that we're having now we have these cbos and non-profit organizations using huntersview name to get funding. i'm asking you supervisors, you guys need to look into that. they are going through the cbos and getting tickets for this and tickets for that and not giving it to the residents that live there and pay rent. it's not fair. who are the people to decide where the money is going without us being at the table? we're asking you desperately, we have a right to be able to have connection with our services which they are not doing. if they are going to give it to somebody else, why are they here? i hope we can continue to work with mr. alvarez and he has given me time and patience working with the housing
's tough to fit it in but it's important to fit it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be prepared for. so the one thing i'm passing on is keep the momentum. >> thank you, all. one other benefit that was cited in the after action review and also was mentioned tod
an institutional perspective at the tactical level in the marine corps. that's an area where we could use some improvement. our forces deployed to the western pacific certainly understand this, and they pass it on among themselves. the forces we deploy from southern california and the east coast that float into theater understand disaster assistance and humantarian response very well. that hasn't quite migrated itself into the institutional arena in terms of forces stationed here in the united states as it would relate to defense support to civil authorities. i think that's primarily -- this is not a primary mission for us. it's something that we do pay attention to, of course, as we deploy overseas. not necessarily forces we have here in the states. we do understand immediate response, rolling out the gate to help our neighbors in an immediate nature, but i think not so much in terms of mobilization and deploying inside our country. so, this is an area where opportunities like san francisco fleet week will allow us for, and i believe at some point really incorporate this in some internal doct
, and that money is required to be used either to increase rider ship -- increase rider ship and to improve productivity of muni's system. this money should be used to maintain these vehicles to fix the vehicles that are broken down, to rehabilitate the vehicles that need rehabilitation, and to expand the size of muni's fleet, all with the goal of being -- having a reliable muni system for the people of san francisco. so that people don't have to crowd on the platforms, don't have to crowd into these vehicles and can get where they're going in a timely way. the best way -- the most effective way by far to increase rider ship on muni is to have a reliable system so that people have confidence that muni will serve their needs. * the mta, senior management and board of directors will soon be deciding how to spend this tpi money, the $6.7 million, that can be used to maintain and improve the reliability of the muni system. in my view, this is a test of muni management. it is a test about how serious this agency is about reversing the decades of severe under investment and the reliability of the
. now residents belong a long and costly recovery process. >> the u.s. markets are set to reopen after being closed the last few days. the new york mass transit system is still shut down. >>> new sthats now expect profit growth to hit the slowest since lifting. >>> welcome to today's show. the good news is financial markets start trading again. >> well, good news or it depends on how they open. certainly there's people with pent up demand. >> i think whatever happens, the fact that we're back up and trading is a good thing. >> the interesting question is why. but why couldn't the new york stock exchange have gone with its electronic trading systems. will this serve as a catalyst to maybe pursue that route the next time with more confidence. >> it's a day of cleanup. >> yes, it is. millions of people in the northeastern u.s. will spend days or weeks to recover from sandy, which is being blamed for at least 46 deaths. at its peak, more than 8.5 million homes and businesses were without power. new york city and new jersey, especially the jersey shore, were the hardest hit. president obama
kelly, pat gallager, jim wonderman, we are expecting ron conway and mary murphy to join us. i also wanted to turn the microphone over to mayor lee to talk about why we are here. that is to unveil our logo, social media campaign. we will have rich silverstein, the head of this amazing ad agency working the past month to come to this point. we are going to hear from the ceo of the 49ers, jet york as well. supervisor mark ferrell, who will be our key liaison to the board of supervisors here in san francisco i want to acknowledge mayor reeve and williams weren't able to make it. we are committed to the effort and our theme of bringing the bowl to the bay. that will be important because we can't do this alone. we are excited to work with them as well. without furthered adieu i will ask mayor lee to come up and perform, talk about the first tweet and our social media campaign. >> great, thank you. thank you, daniel. [applause] >> thank you very much for your leadership on this as well. i knew that when we sat down and talked about this kind of little dream we had that you became the per
participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-c
the 31st. thanks for getting up with us and watching "fox & friends first". >> we begin with an extreme weather alert after the monster storm devastated so much of the area. >> the devastation she left behind up and down the east coast it is unimaginable. >> now i have nowhere to go. >> the entire new jersey coastline changed forever. portions of the state's iconic boardwalk swallowed up by the sea. >> thoemotions are overflowing. >> i grew up here. i have been here since i was born. this is absolutely sickening. >> the pictures of devastation te seem never ending. the resilience prevails. a quiet beach front community in new york that became the scene of a horrific destruction now coming to grips with all of the devastation more than 100 already flooded homes in breezy point burned to the ground by this raging fire. as residents there ban together firefighters who responded to the scene are saying it was unlike anything that they have ever seen before. todd starns joins us with the lathes. >> not only before they battling the flames but but they were battling the water. the homes that
out and join us, you know, on this evening. my namey. the director of the night rover challenge. i'm going to kind of be the moderator for tonight, as we go through this first-ever challenge america summit. so i've got just a few things that, you know, i wanted to do with everyone, before we get into the program. first of all, i just want to take a minute and have everyone just look around this room. in this room, we have amazing people that are corporate, nonprofit, and government, all focused on challenge driven innovation in some way or another. this is a really powerful,interf people that are gathered here to look at how competitions can drive innovation. that's what tonight is all about, is, you know, the next step in creating a real wave of innovation. my job tonight is just to give you a little bit of background on what we are, what we're tiqp)q)s that we have.roup of so just to get going with that, i want to tell you a little bit about this thing called the night rover/< challenge. this is a collaboration between the clean tech open, unoodle, and nasa. it's a program from n
the questions for tonight's debate. the results of the candidate survey are used by the san francisco public press to create a non-partisan voter guide that summarizes where the candidates stand on the issue and will be available on the website soon. meanwhile hvnnjp. preview you may pick up a copy of the current issue of the san francisco public press at the table in the back of the room, which has a fold out summarizing the candidates' position. a little bit about the format of this evening's event. each question will be directed to three candidates or in some cases two. each of these candidates will have one minute to respond. following the named candidates' responses, other candidates may elect to use one of their three discretionary time cards, which they have all been provided. to speak to the question for one minute as well. we ask that after the candidate uses the card, they deposit the card in the basket in front of them, so each candidate, in fact, uses the card on only three occasions. the timekeeper in the first row will hold up a yellow card to signify to the speaking candidat
. so jobs has been a huge priority for us. trying to find -- trying to work with city agencies, with community-based organizations, to make sure that young people, especially, have opportunities to make choices in their lives. and so that is why we have been focused very much on job-training and wrap-around services in that respect also. i think there are older adults and other folks who also could use additional employment. so i think jobs is a big issue for me. >> miss johnson? >> i agree that it's difficult to pick just one issue. but i think a lot of our policy issues that we're having, that you have in front of us come from a lack of accountable. where is your money being spent? how is it being spent? there is a lot of mismanagement. and there is a lot of money that goes places we don't know where it's going. and you can see it running through all of this discussion of all of the polices. are our elected officials making policy decisions that are sustainable? that promote equity? or are they for-sale to the highest bidder? these are the things that we need to address
rachel maddow show" starts now. >> thank you for staying with us. take a look at this map. this is a time lapse map put together by "the new york times." it starts at 4:00 a.m. yesterday morning. it's more than half the entire east coast of the u.s. from virginia all the way up to maine. the yellow dots represent people without power. you see a little yellow dot here and there. this is at 4:00 a.m. yesterday morning. this is what happened next. over the course of 24 hours, look at that. as sandy battered the eastern sea board 6 million customers were left in pitch black. the swath of the eastern united states totally blacked out over the course of one day. and at this hour, more than 6 million electricity customers remain without power in the east. when they say this is the largest storm to have ever hit the east coast of the united states, the word largest in that phrase actually just means the physical area that is covered by this storm, which you can see in the fact we had outages from virginia to maine. but in terms of the direct hit of this storm, part of what makes this a storm of n
were having propelled the three worlds to victory. the other of us having seen we had an aggressive adversary on our hands and looking back what a horrible last century or so, we had to do better. and we did it by this iteration of objectives and capabilities. and we put together what has amounted to a global economic and security commons from which we all have benefited and continue to benefit. [speaker not understood]. so, we have to keep working at it. and i think the things that have been talked about here are very much in the line of keeping [speaker not understood]. niche a was mentioned this morning. that was a fantastic piece of work by the navy. it turned around the attitudes of niche a toward the united states. it was a the kind of building block we look for in an economic and security commons. just as when we in san francisco see not only what the military can bring to the party and help us with, not only how we can interact with the military, but also we say to ourselves, it's also up to us to do everything we can for ourselves. we're not kind of an outfit, it's easier f
too much? no. he'll be pliable, bendable usable to the same crowd that took w., used him and dumped him in history's hamper. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show" from new york. cleanup begins after sandy decimates towns and leaves millions in the dark. we'll have the latest on the damage and the government federal response. what do you think of the federal response now? has it been good? this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >>> my message to the federal government, no bur rak eaucracy red tape, get resources where they are needed as fast as possib possible. >> president obama has put disaster relief in high gear as millions across the east coast are in peril. >> the cooperation has been outstanding. >> romney's silence has been deafening. >> would you eliminate aid to fema if you were president? >> as hurricane sandy wreaks havoc across the northeast, first responders, nurses and neighbors have stepped up in tremendous acts of heroism. we'll take a look at these brave men and w
at a later hearing. the first one is for ellis street and conditional use to allow the partial conversion to a car rental office and car rental agency that is doing business as enterprise rent-a-car. next is for 47 cambon drive and conditional use authorize arizona and for car sales or rental use doing business as you hall within the shopping district. commissioners follow public comment that removes them from the consent calendar. these items are before you for consideration. >> thank you. any public comment on the items on thed consent calendar? seeing none it is closed. >> move to approve. >> thank you. commissioners, the motion on the floor is for approval of both items eight and nine as they are proposed. on that motion commissioner antonini. >> aye. >> commissioner. >> aye. >> commissioner. >> aye. >> commissioner. >> aye. >> commissioner. >> aye. >> thank you the motion passed unanimously. commissioners are there any other commission matters? >> commissioner antonini. >> thank you. a couple of things and first of the all and not to throw water on the giants and i was there
transportation authority. let us take it serious. often time, i see millions of dollars, no deliberations whatsoever. let it go forward. that nonsense should stop. that is utter disregard for the constituents. you are representing. you have to say something. if it's millions of dollars, $15 million. $5 million. $10 million, you just can't sit there and not say a word. okay the san francisco county transportation, the san francisco county transportation authority and the so-called experts. they don't even represent the diversity of san francisco. they don't represent the diversity of san francisco. how are we choosing this so-called experts? on lifestyle, something else? if you speak the truth, you say, that's not politically correct. what is politically correct? is transparency politically correct? is accountability politically correct? when a high-level mta official talks to me and says she doesn't trust or he doesn't trust the san francisco transportation authority, and the deliberation and if we say what we have to say, after we have the documents is that politically correct? come on,
care of what's in front of us, to a strategic kind of plan that we can now look at and really do the best for the city. >> so the captain and the colonel, through the discussions that took place yesterday, what are some of the things you learned about relating to civilian issues that will exist and how will you be able to help? ?oo ?a northern california has rich and diverse medical response capabilities. it's impressive the types of capabilities, the number of assets, the number of people trained to do these things are. the california national guard has air and land assets that are substantial and can be rapidly deployed to assist the civil responders in their mission to move people, to get things set up, to establish common security. it's a partnership that really needs to happen and is natural. the governor controls the california national guard, he can make forces appear very rapidly in support of a regional disaster, a local emergency or wherever they are needed, and transportation, communication, security logistics capabilities that come to the table really augment the m
. the trick is for us to sit out there and talk with all the different regional areas including san francisco and make sure we understand how we're going to work together in the event we have an event that takes our services out or is greater than what we're actually expecting and that's the challenge for all of us, all the service providers, is working together to figure out how to make that happen. >> mr. boland. >> this is where we fit into that link. we represent the utilities that protect and build the resill yepbs into the infrastructure. we fill a gap in attitude which is the relationships, distant and local relationships, cross boundaries between the multi disciplines in the utilities. we are able to cross those lines in the counties and step up to state operations so everybody is operating in a common operating picture so everybody understands what's available not only in their jurisdiction, but what kind of resources we can bring to bear, short and long-term, how distant those are, what the qualifications are. we have master resource catalogs designed just like fire scope and cal
found. the cost was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, n
coming in to us from the height of the storm on monday night. surveillance video shows water filling the tunnel used by amtrak and commuter trains that go under new york's east river, but the damage along the jersey shore is something we have never seen before. these are ariel photos you can see. most of the six people killed in that state died on long beach island and a neighboring barrier island. governor chris christie calls the devastation unthinkable. tuesday he tries to comfort one of the many victims. >> very difficult day. i know. we'll rebuild. we're tough. >> we're tough. >> not far away in seaside heights an incredible site here. that's a roller coaster partially submerged in the ocean. we're going to have more on that in a moment. >>> first, in new york city the subway system remains crippled after heavy flooding caused what officials say the worst damage in its 108 year history. no one knows when it will be up and running again. >>> let's go back to new jersey. there were countless rescues there and for some the realization that they were no match for mother nature. >> t
's it for tonight. thanks for joining us. we will see you back here tomorrow night. the. ♪ lou: good evening, everybody. i'm lou dobbs. you're looking at video of the devastation caused by hurricane sandy. much of that devastation centered on new jersey where the powerful storm came ashore. a storm almost 900 miles wide, growing rest were from the atlantic at 30 miles-per-hour last night. hurricane sandy was a monster storm, one that has killed at least 39 people in this country after killing nearly 70 people in the caribbean since last friday. hundreds of thousands of people evacuated as the storm advanced in its wake billions of dollars in damage, more than 8 million people tonight without power. the hurricane slammed into the northeast with winds upwards of 90 miles-per-hour and a record-breaking 14-foot east coast storm surge, tearing up coastal communities up and down the eastern seaboard. say making her landfall in southern new jersey and, as you can see, the resort-laden jersey shore beach communities were among the hardest hit. you're looking at the most recent overhead iages, punish
, bringing wind, rain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the death toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the storm has affected an estimated one out of every five americans, bringing some business to a standstill over flooding, closed airports, and no public transportation. while rescue efforts continue tonight, early damage estimates are still rough, running between $10 billion and $20 billion, according to eqecat. hurricane irene did $10 billion damage 14 months ago. >> susie: wall street was closed again today for the second straight day because of hurricane sandy. this is the first two-day weather-related shutdown sin
such a weakened position that it's forced us to open ourselves to any mets -- methods, be it outsourcing and leveraging that private effort in capital and just letting you do your thing. in some ways we could be the libertarian dream here. [laughter] >> i saw two people leave the room. [laughter] here's a question, what's the advice for do detroit? overlap, overlay, not an ip instant city in china, right? there's no unified government, it's fragmented at the bureaucracy level, and there's this capacity issue, serious capacity issue within government. what's the advice? >> well, i don't suspect that a lot of the entrepreneurs in this room who are the talent pool for the next economy in detroit are thinking how do i get a job with the city. so -- >> no career advice. >> no, but i mean, seriously. the young talent pool, the 20-somethings and 30-somethings are not thinking about the public sector as a career path. so let's just be blunt and honest. the city is not going to be able to harness the talent that's there that will get the city to the next place. so invert the qu
people that have been working with us for a long time to move this piece forward so we can go ahead and start building. thank you very much. >> thank you. any other speakers? seeing none, public comment is closed. colleague, is there a motion to split the legislation? without objection we're spliting it. >> no objection. >> and then miss miller, so we vote separately on both of the items. which one do we vote on first? >> the original legislation. >> so for the original legislation, colleagues, can we move that forward without objection? great. and on the split --. >> mr. chair, the original legislation i believe is being continued and the divided legislation is being recommended. >> so let's rescind -- we didn't vote on the first item, so is there any objection to continuing the first item to the call of the chair? i don't see where -- to the call of the chair. is there any objection to continuing it? seeing none. now a vote on the split item that's before us. can we move that forward without objection, colleagues? thank you. . >> thank you, colleagues, thank you, mr. cha
was weaker than me and realized, put myself in that position. u.s. attorney for the northern district of california melinda joined the campaign today saying changes are coming. >> it's capturing everyone's heart,. >> reporter: but it's the students that are most effected by the movie. >> there is no purpose watching someone get hurt over nothing. >> to be better person and be nice to each other. bullying is not right thing to do and it should be stopped. >> cheryl: that was lyanne melendez reporting. joining us is what is being done to combat bullying. jeanie saunders, safety manager for the alameda county office of education. i just want to start quickly. you were bullied yourself? >> i was. it goes back to that experience, i can still think of the words that the students used to bully me. i talk with other adults. >> cheryl: so it lasts a long time? >> it does. >> cheryl: you are committed to this issue. what are school administrators doing? >> school administrators start by creating policies. having clear and consistent policies and procedures for bullying. it's really the best way
and the of the country and now have the largest budget surplus we have ever had. it will make a possible for us to strengthen our budget reserves and i believe we can cut taxes for every resident. use every paper things in indiana. when you are speaker of the house, for five of the six years, indiana ran deficits. came in, indiaaniels was $700 million in debt and a deficit of $700 million. i would like to know, from my colleagues on stage, how we will mature and preserve the fiscal integrity of indiana. >> if you spent the last 12 years in india and not congress you would know that our budget needs to be balanced. i have a balanced bipartisan a balanced budget. and the things you talked about were supported by david long, and lieutenant governor. find laughable that united states congressman would lecture anyone about fiscal responsibility. you voted not once, not twice but five times congressman. you voted and the results in increased our deficit by 200 billion, billion with a b dollars. >> find a key house, senate and governor's races on the c-span, c-span radio and c- 2012.
comparing us to la. we have decided that before we have that discussion, here at the commission, that we should have interested persons meetings with the public. and get some input from them. so we schedule two of them for december. and then we planned to bring that report before you for the january meeting. >> that is a good idea. >> to answer your question, going back to the scheduling. >> sure. >> so for december, we don't... there is nothing on tentatively schedule for the 14th, december 14th? >> no. >> there is not. >> okay. thank you. >> okay. anything public comment? >> on the executive director's report. >> thank you, dr. kerr again. this chart on the first page of the director's report, that has 6 categories of investigations and enforcements, mr. st. croix introduced that chart in 2006, but the first month that this chart was introduced that was whistle blower/sunshine ordinance. since then, in the last six years, the word whistle blower has not appeared. now whistle blower retaliation is arguably a more serious problem than any of these because it involves the destruction of s
that is it for willis report, thank you for joining us. have a gate night. we'll see you right back here tomorrow. lou: good evening i am lou dobbs, we're looking at some worst of the devastation, and destruction caused by hurricane sandy. you are looking at is the small new york city community of breezy point, queens, home after home, burned to the ground. more than 100 houses reduced to ash, breezy point, one of many east coast communities devastated. by the superstorm. at least 62 storm-related deaths have been reported since sandy made landfall in southern enginemenmentnewjersey. 71 pearished in the caribbean. and national largest city is still struggling to begin to recover. large swaths of downtown manhattan are still underwater. and battery tunnel is filled with water. there are no estimates on when it will be pumped dry. across the hudson, in hoboken, national guard there, working to evacuate 20,000 rez dent 20 rese been without power for two days, and streets emerged. and destruction along jersey shore, agonizing to rehold. the resort town, off limits tonight even residents
, creating a potentially devastating hybrid that could ravage parts of the u.s. northeast early next week. president obama took a break from campaigning thursday to cast an early ballot in his hometown of chicago. speaking at the polling center, obama encouraged americans to take advantage of early voting. >> for all of you who have not yet voted early, i just want everybody to see what an incredibly efficient process this was, thanks to the outstanding folks who are at this particular polling place. obviously, folks in illinois and take advantage of this. but all across the country, we are seeing a lot of early voting. it means you do not have to figure out whether you need to taint time off work, figure out how to pick up the kids, and still cast your ballot if something happens on election day, you'll have already taken care of it. and as bad weather, w you will weather,et. or in chicago, snowy. this was really convenient. >> campaigning in ohio, mitt romney predicted to supporters his election would mean an increase in workers' take-home pay. >> the president does not have a plan to g
, for getting us started. thank you all for for for being. it's really exciting to have this thing underway, we've been working on it for a long time. what we do at techonomy, up til now it's within antic i havation -- invitation only, leaders thing in the desert, and we wanted to get your message out in the broader community, particularly in the united states where we think there are some messages that are not sufficiently understood. and that's what, i hope, you will be hearing throughout the day today. and the messages at this event are focused on four issues; u.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth -- which is tied, of course, to the first two -- and then the revival of our cities with detroit as case study number one. we are very proud to be in detroit because we see it as a great city that has incredible potential that we would just love to help participate in that dialogue to help move that process forward a little faster. but what we really want to do is change the dialogue about how the world thinks about technology. because we really don't think it is understood or a
, i will make a suggestion... i mean i am... i do find it meaningful that the city attorney reminds us that we have no legal conflict either individually or collectively. i have no obligation to the executive director, the executive director obligation is to the commission as a group and to the city and county, not personal. i can understand why we don't have staff to investigate their supervisor, that makes complete sense. so in trying to... i just want you to create a window where we didn't just rush to do something that thoughtful people were flagging for. but as we were trying to construct it, as a question of legal conflict and of our confidence to do it and our responsibility to do it, which is the other part mr. gibner raised. there is the past practice, the past example involving the deputy director, where we did seek counsel from others so that it would not be a staff colleague doing the investigation, but this body handled it. and i quite honestly can't remember if i was on at that time, and if so, whether we analyzed this, i came on in 07, probably not in time for that item.
using a gun. recently, "american greed: the fugitives" spoke with barksdale from a federal prison, where he said he always knew how the scam would end up. barksdale gets nearly 11 years in prison, but prosecutors say, in truth, jackson was the brains behind the scheme, and is facing a sentence that fits her role as the scam's alleged leader. >> neisha jackson was looking at some years. there's no doubt about it. >> narrator: matthew segal is an assistant u.s. attorney in sacramento who prosecuted barksdale. in october 2011, he's back in court, ready to put this massive case to bed. >> there we are in the morning, and it's time for neisha jackson, actually, to be sentenced. her lawyer's there, and i'm there. the judge is there. but no jackson. >> narrator: as time passes, jackson's lawyer says she's gotten a phone call from her client. jackson says she's not there because she's in the hospital. segal isn't buying it. >> given that the entire nature of this case was using the phones for fraud, i only would have been comfortable if i had seen jackson right in front of me. >> narrator: his d
investigators that told me that in person, in their offices separately. we have a u.s. army cid, criminal investigation division, i'll give you each a copy of what was said there. thank you. >> thank you. final speaker, please. >>> [speaker not understood]. to get reelected for obama to come clean about the [speaker not understood] of 9/11, [speaker not understood] former president bush trapped in afghanistan. during last momon's presidential debate on foreign policy, the president of our $16 billion corrupt united states gave aid to domestic enemies panatumimabv to betray people, unconstitutional wars against cia fabricated enemies for fascist gain. obama claimed to be our commander-in-chief, which he is not. he [speaker not understood] end the war in iraq which he has not. he lied about those ho actually killed us on 9/11 t. was not al qaeda. the three capital crimes of trees on rendered constitutionalist turn dictator president obama [speaker not understood]. he can redeem himself. number three, more mass murder mitt transformed himself to more money mitt romnesia. [speaker not underst
to this year's lecture, which is funded by nasd, which is now in the, the private broker of the u.s. industry. the focus is on financial regulation and each year we have had a leading public official responsible in some ways for u.s. regulation. this year, our speaker is a tiny bit of a stretch, but not really much at all. ed haldeman was ceo of freddie mac from a 2009 to just a few months ago. while in that role, ed was not really a formal regulator. he was responsible for running a very large public financial institution. freddie mac and its sibling, fannie mae are what are called government-sponsored entities, gics. for years described as private companies at the public mission of supporting housing or more simply, as mixed public-private enterprises. but in september 2008, both institutions failed financially. they were placed in government conservatorship, becoming quite unmixed just public corporations. the gics have had many problems of their conservatorship. ad was not part of that arriving by the year after conservatorship. but add was part of the solution. the risk of running freddi
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